Man, 83, With Dementia Is Attacked By Motorist For Taking Too Long To Cross St Ann’s Road

An 83-year-old man who has dementia was assaulted and thrown to the pavement as he crossed the road in St Ann’s.

The elderly man was using a zebra crossing in The Wells Road with his daughter when he was attacked, dragged off the road and thrown to the ground.

His daughter, who asked to remain anonymous, told Nottinghamshire Live her father was “really confused” and had left his own home carrying a large suitcase filled with his belongings.

As they were crossing to reach her car, a motorist became impatient and began to beep his horn.

When the driver began to approach them, she believed he was “getting out the car to help”.

The woman, who was left in tears following the ordeal, said: “We were trying to cross and my dad was explaining why he did not want to stay at home when this car beeped, so my dad stopped in the road.

“This man started shouting abuse, I tried to explain that he had dementia, but he said he did not care what he has got. That’s when he got out and he dragged him by his clothes, pushed him to the side and then sped off.”

The woman said her father was taken to the Queen’s Medical Centre after the incident on June 29, but had to be “sedated” for his own health.

She added: “It all just escalated. I’m still in shock. I cannot believe people would do that and I did not want him to go through all that.

“I thought he was getting out of the car to help me. In the end he had to be sedated in a dementia clinic because he was so worked up. I had to run to my car to get my phone to call the police, and my dad started walking off towards Gala Bingo.

“I just cannot believe anyone would do that.”

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- https://leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

Dementia Care Crisis: People Forced To Quit Jobs To Look After Ones

Research by the Alzheimer’s Society looked into people who have had to quit jobs, reduce hours, or change working patterns to care for their loved ones and estimates that this has cost businesses in England £3.2bn in the last year.

Up and down the country, families are desperately trying and often failing to get the good quality dementia care their loved ones need.  Instead, over 100,000 people have had no choice but to leave their jobs and try to care for their loved ones themselves.

The knock-on cost to businesses is only going to get bigger, with more and more people set to develop dementia and no solution put in place to sort out social care.

It’s devastating for people with dementia, devastating for their families and carers, a drain on the NHS and now we see how badly it’s affecting our economy!

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- https://leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

Poor Toilet Hygiene Is Bigger E.Coli Risk Than Uncooked Food – Research

We are more at risk of spreading E.coli bacteria through poor toilet hygiene than under-cooked meat or other food, according to new research.

Scientists have found that most superbug infections associated with E.coli are caused by harmful strains found in human faeces rather than in chicken, pork or other types of meat.

However, there are still plenty of food-poisoning bacteria, including other strains of E.coli, that can be picked up through food.

In order to limit serious, antibiotic resistant E.coli bloodstream infections, we must focus on thorough hand washing and good infection control, as well as the effective management of urinary tract infections.

“Prudent use of antibiotics is essential in both animals and humans. Antibiotics are a finite resource. We need them to continue to work when we get sick.

The research is published in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- https://leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

'Our life savings are spent on care that should be free'

Tell your Vulnerable Loved Ones About Continuing Healthcare(CHC)

Thousands of vulnerable patients in England are missing out on NHS funding for care that they are legally entitled to, it is being claimed. Some families say they have spent nearly all their life savings on filling the gaps.

When 83-year-old Joyce Bryant became ill two years ago with viral encephalitis, it was a tipping point. The illness left her with a substantial brain injury and unable to care for herself.

"Her behaviour was just manic," says her daughter Lyn Timothy. "She was banging on windows. She was hitting out at my dad, pulling plugs out of the sockets in the hospital ward."

The family decided additional support was needed to enable Joyce to stay at home with her husband and applied for funding from NHS continuing healthcare (CHC).

CHC covers the cost of social care for people with complex medical conditions, if the health problem is deemed the main reason they require such help. It exists in a similar form in Wales and Northern Ireland, where it is delivered by health boards. Scotland has different care arrangements called Hospital Based Complex Clinical Care.

But despite clinical documents and videos showing Joyce's "unpredictable behaviour" - those who apply are judged according to national guidelines - the family's local Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) found her needs did not meet its criteria.

"They said her behaviour was not unpredictable. It could be anticipated," Lyn says, adding she is unable to understand its rationale.

Her mother is now confined to bed and has been placed on an end-of-life care register by her GP due to a deterioration in her health.

Every year about 160,000 applications are made for continuing healthcare, costing the NHS around £3bn.

The system has been deemed a "national scandal" by Continuing Healthcare Alliance as it is denying many people the free healthcare they are entitled to. Some are dying before they get the care they need or are forced to sell their homes to pay for care that should be free.

In other cases people did not know about the existence of the funding, as they had not been told about it, or had difficulties "navigating the complexities of the system"

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- https://leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

 

“I have the poo cancer... There's nothing pink about my cancer, it's just brown!” - Deborah James

Deborah James was 35 when she found out that she had stage 4 bowel cancer.

While undergoing treatment, she has written and spoken out about the need for people to be aware of the symptoms of bowel cancer and why we need to pay more attention to our poo.

She has a column in The Sun newspaper and is one of the hosts of the award-winning BBC Radio 5 live podcast about cancer, You, Me and the Big C.

Watch the video to hear how Deborah discovered her cancer, and the signs we should all look out for.

 

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community.

Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- https://leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

Eating and drinking independently after a stroke tastes the best!

I would like you to imagine, for a moment, how you would feel if you were suddenly struck down with a stroke - seemingly coming from nowhere in the space of a moment, and with potentially life changing consequences – not just for you who is immediately affected, but also for your loved ones.

After all, shaky hands, limited movement in your neck and/or potential paralysis down one side of your body, would make it nearly impossible for you to eat and drink independently. And having to have someone assist you with your meals, or face spilling food on a table or yourself, can be embarrassing and have a negative effect on your self-esteem and even lead to you refusing to eat.

Dealing with the aftermath of a stroke can be physically and emotionally stressful. Depending on the severity of the stroke, you may lose some of your mental and physical abilities. Some of your abilities may return over time, while others may not. You need to relearn and practice every day movement sequences - which include eating and drinking, to help promote dignity, independence and the enjoyment of food once again.

You may have a loved one or care for ladies and gents who are stroke survivors, and by empathizing with their conditions and symptoms, you can gain a better understanding of how best you can help them:

Here we talk about some of the ways a stroke can affect normal eating, and offer you our tips and solutions to help overcome them:

Swallowing difficulties-

A stroke survivor may experience choking coughing, or gagging while eating, or find that liquid comes out of their nose when they try to swallow. It may get better over time, but a few tips can help:

If using cutlery is a challenge –

A stroke can weaken the muscles in arms or hands making it hard to use traditional forks, knives, and spoons. Try:

Eating with one hand –

A stroke can lead to paralysis (temporary or permanent) down one side of the body, making eating independently more challenging, try the following ideas:

Eating slowly –

When recovering from a stroke and relearning every day skills including eating and drinking independently it can take longer to eat meals, which can cause them to get cold and therefore be unappetising for the person who then gives up on eating and becomes at greater risk of malnutrition.

Our Keep Warm Plate and Keep Warm Bowl enable the slowest eaters to enjoy their meals, hot, to the very last bite

Non-slip grip pads on the side pf the plate and bowl not only ensure a safe hold, but also conceal the openings for the thermal function which are both safe and easy to fill with hot or cold water or crushed ice ( to also use for desserts and ice cream to keep them cool)

A non-slip ring under the base ensures a firm stance whilst eating.

Our colourful and functional range of Ornamin tableware, with its supportive features, compensate for just these types of disability, and can help to facilitate independent and carefree eating and drinking. They hold products securely in place on the table, prevent them from slipping out of hands and, like an invisible second hand, allow people with just one hand to eat on their own with ease.

 

For more details head over to our website request your copy of the Dignified Dining Solutions Guide or give us a call on 01773 713713

Lewis Hamilton sends F1 car to home of terminally ill boy

Moments after he recaptured the lead of the championship from Valtteri Bottas following his fine victory at the Circuit de Catalunya, an emotional Hamilton dedicated his triumph to Harry Shaw – a five-year-old who has been diagnosed with a rare form of cancer.

Hamilton had been alerted to Harry’s tragic plight ahead of Sunday’s race after Mercedes showed him a video of support sent in by the youngster from his hospital bed.

Harry has since been transferred to his Surrey home for his final days.

And, in a touching gesture by the sport’s world champions, they sent a Mercedes F1 car to Harry’s house.

Harry was also presented with Hamilton’s winning trophy from Sunday’s Barcelona race.

Hamilton, his voice croaking, said: “Today, I was just super-inspired by this kid that sent me a message.

“He was my spirit angel.”....

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- https://leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

 

 

 

Sisters encourage others to support foster carers

When you meet sisters Jan and Paula, it’s hard not to notice the close bond between them, which has been made even stronger through fostering and supporting each other.

While both sisters now foster children and teenagers full-time, they have also fostered part-time as support carers on weekends and in school holidays.

Now the sisters want to encourage more people to apply to become support carers to allow children in care to experience something new and to help full-time foster carers to have a break.

To hear more from Jan and Paula, watch their story here by clicking the link below...

 

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- https://leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'I've lost 24 friends to suicide'

Natasha has battled with anorexia and self-harm from the age of 12 and spent 10 years in mental health units across the country.

She was initially not referred to CAMHS, an oversight she says made her condition worsen.

When she was finally referred, suffering from anorexia and beginning to self-harm, she was too ill for community care and was admitted to a specialist inpatient unit.

She was to spend most of the next decade in units dotted around the country, many of them privately-run, with her fees paid for by the NHS.

Natasha said: "My commissioner, who was a lovely woman, referred to me as the million dollar baby because they (private providers) made millions out of the NHS for my care."

Her low point came in 2012 when she was admitted to a hospital in Maidenhead, run by private care provider, where she was supposed to be under one-to-one supervision to prevent self-harm.

Click on the link below to hear Natasha describe her experience in her own words:

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/ive-lost-24-friends-to-suicide/vi-AABn7ye?ocid=sw

 

Every year tens of thousands of under-18s in England are referred to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, known as CAMHS.

The most unwell are sent to "tier four" in-patient mental health units, many of which are privately-run but paid for by the NHS to provide specialist treatment.

Children are often placed in units many miles from home and family because of a shortage of appropriate services in their local area.

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- https://leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

 

 

 

Line of Duty star's dementia choir 'not just dancing and singing' but 'provoking memories'

Actress Vicky McClure from Line of Duty fame shows the huge impact music can have on people living with dementia in a moving BBC documentary, where she puts together a choir made up of people with dementia aged from 31 to 87.

he two-part documentary ‘Our Dementia Choir with Vicky McClure’ focusses on the science and why music and singing are so stimulating for the brain.

Vicky McClure’s grandmother was diagnosed with vascular dementia at the age of 75. Ms McClure along with her mum cared for her grandmother and saw first-hand how singing and music calmed her. Now, she has joined forces with some of the country’s leading experts to measure the emotional and physical responses of Vicky's choir, as they prepare to put on a major performance.

Ms McClure told the BBC: “I watched Nana being taken by dementia and I watched her personality slowly fade away and it's one of the hardest things to watch a family member go through.

“I also saw how music helped change her mood, calming her down and for a while bringing us back the old Nana.”

According to The Open University, evidence suggests that music therapy can relieve the symptoms of anxiety and depression for people living with dementia and may lead to some improvement in their awareness. This research suggests music therapy can be used to communicate with someone who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia.

Many people associate particular songs with major events; leaving school, meeting a partner, falling in love, getting married or forming a civil partnership.

Listening to music can cause both emotional and physical reactions - it can speed up heart rate and breathing - or slow them down and help people relax.

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- www.leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

Comedian chats to unsuspecting strangers to shine light on loneliness

Comic Andy Parsons spends a day striking up conversations with strangers to support the Campaign to End Loneliness charity and get everyone talking.

People everywhere are being urged to unglue themselves from their mobile phones and simply talk to each other face to face to combat a growing loneliness problem.

Andy Parsons who appears on ‘Live at the Apollo’ has fronted secretly filmed footage for the charity, which captures his efforts to chat with strangers on a sofa in a shopping centre.

The film shows people’s surprised reactions when Mr Parsons coaxes them of their smartphones to have a chat.

Andy Parsons said: “I was apprehensive about just sitting down in the middle of a shopping centre and initiating conversations with total strangers. “I wasn’t sure whether many people would talk to me at all, let alone whether we would get any footage we could turn into a film.

“As it was, everybody, without exception, was pleasant and the four hours I spent there passed incredibly quickly."

Despite some early awkward moments, the video shows laughs can be had by talking to strangers.

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- www.leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Tomlinson helps 83-year-old who lost wife to dementia complete bucket list

In Louis Tomlinson’s new video, the song has taken a back seat with the video instead focusing on 83-year-old Richard, who lost his wife to Alzheimer’s in the same month as the One Direction star lost his mum to leukemia.

In the heart-warming video, the pop singer helps Richard to achieve a list of things he had wanted to do since his wife Pat passed away in 2016.

The video for the song 'The Two of Us' shows Louis surprising Richard, saying he wants to help him tick a few things off of his bucket list.....

Couple with dementia still hold hands and 'wouldn't cope apart'

A couple in their nineties, who both receive live-in care, are still smitten with each other and “wouldn’t be able to cope if they were apart”.

Marie, aged 96, and her husband Ron, 97, are still very much in love, according to their son Nick Murray, who says: “They would be very upset if they were separated. I don’t think they would cope if they were apart from each other. They wouldn’t be able to understand why they weren’t together. That is why we have live-in care for them, so they can stay together in a familiar environment.”

The pair have never been apart, except seven years ago when Marie had a fall and Ron visited her in hospital every other day.

The couple met during the war in 1943. They first set eyes on each other at a dance in Middlesbrough and carried on their relationship through the war.

Marie was training to be an English teacher and Ron was in the RAF working as an aircraft electrician on Spitfires, Hurricanes and Lancaster bombers.

In 1948, worried that Marie’s mum would disapprove of them marrying, Marie crept out of her house and she and Ron went to the registry office and got married.

Now 71 years later, they have three children, five grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

Spending time with the family has always been very important to them, explains Nick. “When we were kids, mum and dad used to take us all on weekly trips to the North York Moors with a picnic. They also really enjoyed doing the garden together and visiting garden centers.”

His mum was the organiser in the family, who paid the bills and booked the holidays whereas his dad liked to tell ‘dad’ jokes.

Marie has a really good laugh, Ron is quieter. They sleep in separate beds in the same room and they always wave to each other when they go to bed at night. They give each other kisses and they still hold hands when they sit next to each other. They will often have a laugh together. They are quite jolly people and Marie still says Ron is handsome.

"They have just celebrated their 71st wedding anniversary. They got a card from the Queen which we have put in a frame. We celebrated with cake, the family came over and my mum kept telling us the story of how they eloped to the registry office.” Adds Nick

Marie and Ron have always had a good relationship, according to their son, who adds: “Of course they have argued now and then but they were only ever disagreements over things like my dad taking too long in the bathroom. But despite their illness they have both retained their great sense of humour, which is why I think they are still together after all these years.”

 

Leymar Healthcare provide Homecare Services in Ashfield and 24 Hour Live in Care in the UK to vulnerable adults in their community. Please contact our office on 01623 360 193 or email us at info@leymarltd.co.uk.

Alternatively, you can use our Contact Form on our website:- www.leymarhealthcare.co.uk/contact us/